Louisville

Next Breakfast of Champions Features Orchestra’s Teddy Abrams

Teddy Abrams is shaking things up in the Louisville Arts community – and far beyond. The dynamic Louisville Orchestra Music Director will share his insights and energy at the March 9 Breakfast of Champions. Teddy will discuss the evolution of music, seamlessly incorporating (you guessed it!) MUSIC into his entertaining talk. You will not want to miss this one! About Teddy Abrams: An unusually versatile musician, Teddy Abrams is a widely acclaimed conductor, as well as an established pianist, clarinetist, and composer. This season marks the beginning of his tenure as Music Director of the Louisville Orchestra and Music Director and…


The Healing Place, Heroin and Helping Celebrate Freedom

On Friday, the Healing Place holds its annual Celebrate Freedom Dinner. Laurie Dhue, a former cable TV news anchor who appeared on MSNBC, CNN and Fox, will be there to talk about her personal journey and recovery from addiction. She will be a guest on my podcast, the Rusty Satellite Show, and I’m looking forward to speaking with her. If you don’t know about the work of The Healing Place, you should. Addiction is not pretty, and ruins more lives than you can imagine. I went to the Celebrate Freedom Dinner a few years ago, when the actress Ashley Judd…


Ben Folds Fab at Sold-out Kentucky Center

I was pretty sure that Ben Folds was going to put on a memorable show at the Kentucky Center with the Louisville Orchestra. Before last night’s show, I didn’t really know much about Folds. But I knew he had to be more than a mere pop star to get an invite to play with the Orchestra, and that Whitney Hall doesn’t sell out for just any act. And it was special. More on that in a few graphs. About mid-week was when I first realized that – A, I had an opportunity to take Paula somewhere special on Saturday and…


Butchertown, Ben Sollee Are the Stars of Actors’ “At the Vanishing Point”

At The Vanishing Point, currently playing at Actors Theatre, might not be so riveting if it took place in another city, or another neighborhood. But the way it uses Louisville’s Butchertown neighborhood as an omnipresent character in the lives of one family puts your mind squarely on Story Avenue. Or the Fischer’s meatpacking plant, the Oertels brewery, the Kentucky School for the Blind or the Thomas Edison House. All those locations play an integral part in this production. Just as you couldn’t tell a family story about Louisville in 1937 without focusing on the historic flood of that year, the…


See Larry Muhammad’s “Double V” at Ali Center Feb. 4

It was “the good war.” That’s how America portrayed its involvement in World War II: a righteous struggle of freedom against tyranny. But America in the 1940s had legal restrictions denying its black citizens the vote, and segregated them in rundown neighborhoods, poor schools and low-paying jobs. Black GIs were assigned to building roads and waiting tables at officers clubs. Military hospitals kept black blood separate from white, and white officers treated Nazi prisoners more respectfully than they did black servicemen wearing the uniform of Uncle Sam. Crusading African-American newspapers exposed these hateful contradictions with their Double V campaign –…


Getting My Swing Back the Right Way

When I played golf this year, I was hitting drives off the tee close to 300 yards.  I played better, hit the ball further, and enjoyed the game more than ever.  You might say I was pretty happy with myself. Then I met Lenny Mello. Certified by the Titleist Performance Institute, Lenny runs a program that helps guys like me play longer and better. As he explained to me, Titleist has a mission to keep people playing longer, so it created this training series for that purpose. Sure, he has clients who are very young. He has female clients. But…


The Brothers Size Brings Powerful Performances

The Brothers Size, currently being performed at Actors Theatre, is promoted as a “lyrical tale of brotherly love (that) explores the tension between fear and desire on the elusive road to freedom.” That is accurate, perhaps, but it doesn’t prepare you for the reality of the play’s raw emotions, street language and battle of wills between two brothers. One brother, Ogun, embodies hard work and the struggle to make a living (he’s an auto mechanic) running a business. His brother Oshoosi is just out of prison, returning home and prevailing upon his brother to help get him back on a…


Louisville: Let Knowledge Serve the City—the poor need a win-win!

  This testimony is made by Dr. John GilderbloomCell: (502) 608-7567 jgilde02@sprynet.com and Wes Grooms, MUP (and Ph.D. Student) Cell: (202) 549-1779 charlesgrooms@gmail.com as individuals representing themselves and themselves only.   This testimony does not represent the opinion of the University of Louisville or any associated institutions.   We agree with the Council member(s) who have indicated that there will be a boom in local community spending with an additional $86 million in new spending by roughly 65,000 poor residents in Metro Louisville.   We urge you to make use of the highly regarded and award winning local university resources whose first…


Discover Louisville Uncovered with Cyndy Tandy

My friend Cyndy Tandy has been working on this idea for several years, so it’s great to see Louisville Uncovered become a reality. For this week’s Rusty Satellite Show, I checked in with Cyndy as she was taping a new segment of Louisville Uncovered. It’s a series of vignettes lasting about a minute that tell you about something you probably didn’t know about Louisville. Our location was a perfect example. Since I work in Riverport, I’m constantly driving up and down Dixie Highway in Valley Station. The vignettes air on WAVE-TV in conjunction with the Secrets of Louisville Chefs program,…


Tribes at Actors is a Focus on Family Dynamic

Tribes, now playing at Actors Theatre, is about a really loud family in which Mom, Dad, Brother and Sister don’t hold back in expressing themselves, while a younger brother who’s deaf must find  his place at the table. The play, by English writer Nina Raine, opens at a family dinner with a spirited discussion among four family members, while Billy tries vainly to keep up with what everyone’s talking about. Later, Billy, who’s been deaf since birth, meets a girl, and brings her home to meet his family. For anyone who’s experienced being around the deaf community, the play will…